Sibling Saturday Part 5 – Helena Verno

This is part five about the Verno-siblings, siblings of my great-grandmother Julia Verno. This is about Helena Verno. She was born July 30, 1889 in Pskov, Russia. As with the others of the Vernosiblings I don’t have much information.

She married Jan Christian Ugur. He was born October 30, 1883 in Estonia and later on moved to Pskov where they he and Helena got married on January 15 in 1918.

They had three children:

Heinrich – born Pskov (Russia) April 15, 1919
Eduard – born in Pechory (at the time Estonia, today Russia) August 25, 1920
Magdalena – born in Pechory (at the time Estonia, today Russia) November 12, 1923

Helena Verno with husband Jan Christian Ugur and thier
three children Heinrich, Eduard and Magdalena

So, when I started my family history research to me the children was known as Genja, Eddie and Magda. A couple of years ago I found relatives of Eduard at geni.com. In thier documentation Genja was known as Heinrich. I got it explained to me that since they lived in an area where Russian was the main language he was addressed Gennadi, or short, Genja, even if his given name was Heinrich.

When we went to Tallinn in Estonia in August this summer one of the genealogyrelated things I wanted to do was to visit the Pärnamäe cemetery. Heinrich and his wife Roosa was supposed to be buried there. Estonia has a really nice database for locating tombstones, http://www.kalmistud.ee/Cemetery-Portal-of-Estonia. Not only if you are lucky to find what you are looking for, there are zoomable maps where the tombstones are marked out. I had both printed out maps and screendumps of the maps in Evernote on my iPad. Pärnamäe was the second cemetery we visited and I am glad we had the maps because even with maps this tombstone was really hard to find. Walking around that cemetery there were many stones with photographs of the person/s and I was thinking that perhaps there would be a photo on Heinrich’s stone as well. Now, I am happy we found the stone at all. We found the area where it should be, but no stone. Spent at least 30 minutes looking around like 50 stones. On the map you could see exact row and what number it should be but it was not there. Well, not until C decided to look inside an overgrown bush. There it was, totally invisible from the path. There were no photos on it but I was so happy we had found it.

The tombstone was hardly visible.

 

Heinrich Ugur 1919 – 1983 and his wife Roosa 1920 – 1994

 

Earlier posts of the Verno siblings:

Part 1 – Sonja Verno (Oeberg)
Part 2 – Maria Verno (Belinski)
Part 3 – Valentina Verno (Kiljar)

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